This Week’s Good Reads: Gender Bias Study Follow-Up, Honeybee Debates, and the End of Wolves on Isle Royale

1) Last week, I posted about the controversy unfolding around a study that concluded that gender bias does not appear to exist in STEM tenure-track hiring. It continued this week. I especially recommend @DrMRFrancis’s post (“A Surprisingly Welcome Atmosphere,” Slate) and … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Staff Scientists, Gender Bias, Open Access, and Peer Review’s Repeat Referees

1) One of the most popular posts on this blog was when I wrote about how little we know about ecology career paths after the PhD and suggested a population biology model for studying it. Far from limited to ecology, … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Closed-access Ebola Research, Good Allergies, Deaf Whales, and Bronto Embargoes.

1) Yes We Were Warned About Ebola, NY Times, Bernice Dahn, Vera Mussah, & Cameron Nutt. A closed-access paper in a scientific journal warned about the presence of endemic Ebola in the population in Liberia… in the 1980s. Sure would’ve been … Continue reading

Journalists Should Act Like Journalists, Not Like Scientists

A couple of days ago, Christie Aschwanden blogged on The Last Word on Nothing about the recent misreported rape story in Rolling Stone. She makes some good points about the case, most notably that it seems the reporters approached their sources with a story … Continue reading

Morels Are Popping Up, According to a Map of Sightings

For avid mushroom hunters, morel season is the beginning of six months (or more) of fresh and fleeting culinary delights. For those in Piedmont North Carolina, like me, morel season just arrived, according to this citizen science sightings map. You can … Continue reading