This Week’s Good Reads: The Elusive Source of Ebola, the Natural History of Model Organisms, and Whistling Caterpillars

1) Seeking the Source of Ebola, National Geographic, David Quammen 2) “Most people would think it’s a bad thing to be a lightning rod, and I cannot say I enjoy it,” [Oreskes] said. “But remember, the whole purpose of a lightning rod … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Ecologists’ Favorite Statistical Methods, How Biodiversity Inhibits Parasites, and Distractingly Sexist Scientists

1) Last week, I discussed the NY Times’ coverage of retractions in science, which failed to acknowledge that more retractions actually could mean science is doing a better job of outing bad science. Although it’s far from ideal that these retractions happen … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Science in Africa, Public Trust in Science, and Ecological Forecasts

1) Research: Africa’s Fight for Equality, Nature News, Linda Nordling 2) Under the Sea, a Missing Link in the Evolution of Complex Cells, NY Times, Carl Zimmer 3) New method for monitoring global forest health using satellite data monitoring the faint glow of chlorophyll: Solar-Induced Chlorophyll … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Closed-access Ebola Research, Good Allergies, Deaf Whales, and Bronto Embargoes.

1) Yes We Were Warned About Ebola, NY Times, Bernice Dahn, Vera Mussah, & Cameron Nutt. A closed-access paper in a scientific journal warned about the presence of endemic Ebola in the population in Liberia… in the 1980s. Sure would’ve been … Continue reading

People Can and Are Living Alongside Large Carnivores

Yesterday, a study was published in Science that showed that populations of large carnivores are flourishing in Europe, even in areas inhabited by people. This study wasn’t news to me, because there is already quite a bit of literature showing … Continue reading