Last Two Weeks’ Good Reads: Pooping in the Field, Scientists in the Twitterverse, and an Ode to Random Choices

1) Ecologists share their favorite sightings while going to the bathroom in the wilds of their fieldwork: What’s the Best Bird You’ve Seen While on the Toilet?, Living Alongside Wildlife, Rebecca Heisman @_klburke @AlongsideWild The first tine I saw a wolf in … Continue reading

Weekly Good Reads: Blind Experiments, Broadest Impacts, and Writing Explainers

1) Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording, PLoS Biology, Luke Holman et al. 2) Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers, The Open Notebook, Carl Zimmer 3) Population Trend of the World’s Monitored Seabirds, 1950–2010, PLoS One, Michelle … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Lost Museums, Warm-Blooded Fish, and Bamboo Math

1) In last week’s reading update, I mentioned the NAS conference on public trust in science that just took place. Kirk Englehardt, one of the attendees, blogged about one conversation at the conference that he found valuable: How Science Reporters … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Bad Statistics, Changes in Media, and Continued Gender Bias Controversy

1) The controversy over the paper by Williams and Ceci on gender bias in academic hiring (or the lack thereof) that I mentioned last week and the week before continues: Science Careers published a detailed article on it, which reignited the controversy. A summary of … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Staff Scientists, Gender Bias, Open Access, and Peer Review’s Repeat Referees

1) One of the most popular posts on this blog was when I wrote about how little we know about ecology career paths after the PhD and suggested a population biology model for studying it. Far from limited to ecology, … Continue reading