This Week’s Good Reads: Fieldwork Fails, Cecil the Lion, and Salamander Disease

1) For some laughs and some camaraderie, check out #Fieldworkfail stories, which are so great that I wrote a full post about it. Some sightings while pooping in the field, shared last week, also would apply to this hashtag. 2) If you … Continue reading

Weekly Good Reads: Blind Experiments, Broadest Impacts, and Writing Explainers

1) Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording, PLoS Biology, Luke Holman et al. 2) Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers, The Open Notebook, Carl Zimmer 3) Population Trend of the World’s Monitored Seabirds, 1950–2010, PLoS One, Michelle … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: The Elusive Source of Ebola, the Natural History of Model Organisms, and Whistling Caterpillars

1) Seeking the Source of Ebola, National Geographic, David Quammen 2) “Most people would think it’s a bad thing to be a lightning rod, and I cannot say I enjoy it,” [Oreskes] said. “But remember, the whole purpose of a lightning rod … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Ecologists’ Favorite Statistical Methods, How Biodiversity Inhibits Parasites, and Distractingly Sexist Scientists

1) Last week, I discussed the NY Times’ coverage of retractions in science, which failed to acknowledge that more retractions actually could mean science is doing a better job of outing bad science. Although it’s far from ideal that these retractions happen … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Closed-access Ebola Research, Good Allergies, Deaf Whales, and Bronto Embargoes.

1) Yes We Were Warned About Ebola, NY Times, Bernice Dahn, Vera Mussah, & Cameron Nutt. A closed-access paper in a scientific journal warned about the presence of endemic Ebola in the population in Liberia… in the 1980s. Sure would’ve been … Continue reading