Communicating Science Across the Divide: Lessons from the Climate Change & Vaccination Debates

I recently spoke at Emory & Henry College about topics debated in the public sphere that are not debated among scientists, and what those debates teach us about science communication. You can view the slides from that lecture above. Unpacking … Continue reading

Debriefing after the Ecological Society of America’s Centennial Meeting

In lieu of my weekly reading list, I am summarizing the broad take-home messages I picked up at the centennial meeting of the Ecological Society of America last week in Baltimore. You can check out the conversation on Twitter at #ESA100, although … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Fieldwork Fails, Cecil the Lion, and Salamander Disease

1) For some laughs and some camaraderie, check out #Fieldworkfail stories, which are so great that I wrote a full post about it. Some sightings while pooping in the field, shared last week, also would apply to this hashtag. 2) If you … Continue reading

Weekly Good Reads: Blind Experiments, Broadest Impacts, and Writing Explainers

1) Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording, PLoS Biology, Luke Holman et al. 2) Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers, The Open Notebook, Carl Zimmer 3) Population Trend of the World’s Monitored Seabirds, 1950–2010, PLoS One, Michelle … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: The Elusive Source of Ebola, the Natural History of Model Organisms, and Whistling Caterpillars

1) Seeking the Source of Ebola, National Geographic, David Quammen 2) “Most people would think it’s a bad thing to be a lightning rod, and I cannot say I enjoy it,” [Oreskes] said. “But remember, the whole purpose of a lightning rod … Continue reading