This Week’s Good Reads: The Elusive Source of Ebola, the Natural History of Model Organisms, and Whistling Caterpillars

1) Seeking the Source of Ebola, National Geographic, David Quammen 2) “Most people would think it’s a bad thing to be a lightning rod, and I cannot say I enjoy it,” [Oreskes] said. “But remember, the whole purpose of a lightning rod … Continue reading

Last and This Week’s Good Reads: Shaming Journalists, Hyping Research, and Preparing Ecologists for Grad School

Only a few from last week, but they’re too good not to mention: 1) I’m so glad someone collected the evidence to show that most ecology grad students feel ill-prepared in mathematics and statistics for their graduate studies. We can … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Closed-access Ebola Research, Good Allergies, Deaf Whales, and Bronto Embargoes.

1) Yes We Were Warned About Ebola, NY Times, Bernice Dahn, Vera Mussah, & Cameron Nutt. A closed-access paper in a scientific journal warned about the presence of endemic Ebola in the population in Liberia… in the 1980s. Sure would’ve been … Continue reading

People Can and Are Living Alongside Large Carnivores

Yesterday, a study was published in Science that showed that populations of large carnivores are flourishing in Europe, even in areas inhabited by people. This study wasn’t news to me, because there is already quite a bit of literature showing … Continue reading

New Amphibian Diseases Threaten to Exacerbate Worldwide Decline

The decline of the world’s amphibians, in part due to disease caused by the chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis), has caused alarm among conservationists, wildlife managers, and herpetologists. Just as treatments for the disease were showing some successes, including boosting immunity through exposure to dead … Continue reading