This Week’s Good Reads: Evolution 2015, Lost Carbon Sink, and New Pew Data

1) Climate Change: Weighing the World’s Trees, Nature News Feature, Gabriel Popkin 2) New info on what social factors predict people’s choices about controversial science issues. Take home message: It’s not always education, or political affiliation, or religion, or any other social … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Gender Bias Study Follow-Up, Honeybee Debates, and the End of Wolves on Isle Royale

1) Last week, I posted about the controversy unfolding around a study that concluded that gender bias does not appear to exist in STEM tenure-track hiring. It continued this week. I especially recommend @DrMRFrancis’s post (“A Surprisingly Welcome Atmosphere,” Slate) and … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Closed-access Ebola Research, Good Allergies, Deaf Whales, and Bronto Embargoes.

1) Yes We Were Warned About Ebola, NY Times, Bernice Dahn, Vera Mussah, & Cameron Nutt. A closed-access paper in a scientific journal warned about the presence of endemic Ebola in the population in Liberia… in the 1980s. Sure would’ve been … Continue reading

Morels Are Popping Up, According to a Map of Sightings

For avid mushroom hunters, morel season is the beginning of six months (or more) of fresh and fleeting culinary delights. For those in Piedmont North Carolina, like me, morel season just arrived, according to this citizen science sightings map. You can … Continue reading

ESA 2014, Tuesday talks

As usual, I went to some great talks and missed some great talks. Here are summaries of the ones I caught: Thomas Newsome of Oregon State University talked about his work with William Ripple on a trophic cascade involving wolves, coyotes, and … Continue reading