This Week’s Good Reads: Fieldwork Fails, Cecil the Lion, and Salamander Disease

1) For some laughs and some camaraderie, check out #Fieldworkfail stories, which are so great that I wrote a full post about it. Some sightings while pooping in the field, shared last week, also would apply to this hashtag. 2) If you … Continue reading

Weekly Good Reads: Blind Experiments, Broadest Impacts, and Writing Explainers

1) Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording, PLoS Biology, Luke Holman et al. 2) Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers, The Open Notebook, Carl Zimmer 3) Population Trend of the World’s Monitored Seabirds, 1950–2010, PLoS One, Michelle … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Ecologists’ Favorite Statistical Methods, How Biodiversity Inhibits Parasites, and Distractingly Sexist Scientists

1) Last week, I discussed the NY Times’ coverage of retractions in science, which failed to acknowledge that more retractions actually could mean science is doing a better job of outing bad science. Although it’s far from ideal that these retractions happen … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Lost Museums, Warm-Blooded Fish, and Bamboo Math

1) In last week’s reading update, I mentioned the NAS conference on public trust in science that just took place. Kirk Englehardt, one of the attendees, blogged about one conversation at the conference that he found valuable: How Science Reporters … Continue reading

ESA 2014, Tuesday talks

As usual, I went to some great talks and missed some great talks. Here are summaries of the ones I caught: Thomas Newsome of Oregon State University talked about his work with William Ripple on a trophic cascade involving wolves, coyotes, and … Continue reading