This Week’s Good Reads: Ecologists’ Favorite Statistical Methods, How Biodiversity Inhibits Parasites, and Distractingly Sexist Scientists

1) Last week, I discussed the NY Times’ coverage of retractions in science, which failed to acknowledge that more retractions actually could mean science is doing a better job of outing bad science. Although it’s far from ideal that these retractions happen … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Lost Museums, Warm-Blooded Fish, and Bamboo Math

1) In last week’s reading update, I mentioned the NAS conference on public trust in science that just took place. Kirk Englehardt, one of the attendees, blogged about one conversation at the conference that he found valuable: How Science Reporters … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Bad Statistics, Changes in Media, and Continued Gender Bias Controversy

1) The controversy over the paper by Williams and Ceci on gender bias in academic hiring (or the lack thereof) that I mentioned last week and the week before continues: Science Careers published a detailed article on it, which reignited the controversy. A summary of … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Gender Bias Study Follow-Up, Honeybee Debates, and the End of Wolves on Isle Royale

1) Last week, I posted about the controversy unfolding around a study that concluded that gender bias does not appear to exist in STEM tenure-track hiring. It continued this week. I especially recommend @DrMRFrancis’s post (“A Surprisingly Welcome Atmosphere,” Slate) and … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Closed-access Ebola Research, Good Allergies, Deaf Whales, and Bronto Embargoes.

1) Yes We Were Warned About Ebola, NY Times, Bernice Dahn, Vera Mussah, & Cameron Nutt. A closed-access paper in a scientific journal warned about the presence of endemic Ebola in the population in Liberia… in the 1980s. Sure would’ve been … Continue reading