Last Two Weeks’ Good Reads: Pooping in the Field, Scientists in the Twitterverse, and an Ode to Random Choices

1) Ecologists share their favorite sightings while going to the bathroom in the wilds of their fieldwork: What’s the Best Bird You’ve Seen While on the Toilet?, Living Alongside Wildlife, Rebecca Heisman @_klburke @AlongsideWild The first tine I saw a wolf in … Continue reading

Weekly Good Reads: Blind Experiments, Broadest Impacts, and Writing Explainers

1) Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording, PLoS Biology, Luke Holman et al. 2) Carl Zimmer’s Brief Guide to Writing Explainers, The Open Notebook, Carl Zimmer 3) Population Trend of the World’s Monitored Seabirds, 1950–2010, PLoS One, Michelle … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Evolution 2015, Lost Carbon Sink, and New Pew Data

1) Climate Change: Weighing the World’s Trees, Nature News Feature, Gabriel Popkin 2) New info on what social factors predict people’s choices about controversial science issues. Take home message: It’s not always education, or political affiliation, or religion, or any other social … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: Ecologists’ Favorite Statistical Methods, How Biodiversity Inhibits Parasites, and Distractingly Sexist Scientists

1) Last week, I discussed the NY Times’ coverage of retractions in science, which failed to acknowledge that more retractions actually could mean science is doing a better job of outing bad science. Although it’s far from ideal that these retractions happen … Continue reading

This Week’s Good Reads: The Hyperbolome, Making Impact, and Genetic Rescue

This seems to be the week of cool meetings I missed. Including: 1) The General Meeting for the American Society for Microbiology, which you can check out at #ASM2015. Carl Zimmer spoke about the hype around microbiome research, and he … Continue reading